Monday, April 2, 2012

Make it From Scratch: Natural Easter Egg Dye!




Note from Sara:
I'm so excited to have a guest blogger posting for us today!  Katie, from Living Crunchy, is a new friend, and lately, we've been swapping book-length emails about food and diets and eating clean in a world that makes it so tricky to do.  We thought it would be fun to guest-post on each other's blogs, and she came up with a fantastic post to share here!  (Now, I've got to rack my brain for something equally awesome to write up for Living Crunchy!)  


Please give her a nice big welcome and click on over to her blog for awesome tips on green living and raising her two boys!
      


Natural Easter Egg Dye


It’s Easter time, and that means it is time to hard-boil and dye more eggs than you can possibly eat for the festivities! Instead of buying one of those over-priced kits with chemical dye, why not try making your own dye? It is cheap, non-toxic, and lots of fun.




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Red

Beets make an excellent pink or red dye. I had previously made beet dye and froze the extra in ice cube trays. I pulled out a few cubes and thawed them to make some red dye for the eggs.

Orange 

The orange dye was very easy to make. I simply boiled about 2 cups of water with 2 tablespoons of turmeric for a few minutes, and strained it in a fine mesh strainer. This made a beautiful golden orange. 

Yellow 

I did not have much success with my yellow. I tried boiling lemon peels and pureeing them with an egg yolk. It made nice yellow water, but did not dye the egg. EPIC FAIL!

Green 

The first time I made green dye, I used kale, and this worked quite well. On this day, I didn't have kale, so I used red leaf lettuce, boiled the leaves and pureed in a blender and strained the solids. This produced a much softer green.

Blue 

I had the best success with the blue dye. I boiled about 20 fresh blueberries in about 2 cups of water and pureed and drained the solids. The dyed water almost looked red, but it produced a beautiful blue color on the egg.

Purple 

My second epic fail... I was having trouble coming up with a food to make purple. I had read that you can use red onion leaves or blackberries, but I didn't have any on hand. I grabbed some purple flowers from my yard and since it was not going in my food, I felt comfortable putting it on the egg. I boiled the leaves and pureed them and it made a nice soft purple water. NOT a good dye... Next time I'll remember what I learned in Kindergarten and mix red and blue...


If you are making your dye for Easter eggs, be sure to add a tablespoon of vinegar to the warm dye water for maximum color retention on the egg. If you don't add the vinegar, the colors will fade.

We had lots of fun experimenting and making mixed colored eggs and getting crafty by wrapping rubber bands around some for stripes. Have you made your own dye? Please share what worked for you!


5 comments:

  1. I always get purple out of blueberries! I wonder if golden beets would have given you the yellow you wanted.
    Great post!

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    Replies
    1. Golden beets! Great idea. I'll have to try that next time...

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  2. I love the colors. Even though I don't have kids and haven't dyed eggs in many many years, dyed Easter eggs are always a fun thing to see pictures off. Kudos for experimenting with different foods to make your dyes.

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  3. I'm still deciding whether to try making natural Easter egg dye this year. It seems like a good idea and the eggs look pretty but I had read on another blog that it isn't much fun for the kids to do and the colors fade and transfer easily. And then there's the expense ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My kids had the most fun actually making they dye. They liked squeezing the colors out of the foods into the dye cup. I let them pour in the vinegar and then drop their eggs in. Then they went to play and would keep stopping by to check on the eggs.

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